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By: Kelly Faria, Kelsey Maggio, Christine Galley, Mike Gentile

The Harlem Renaissance was a holiday celebrated by the African American culture in the 1920's. The holiday was started when the outburst of art, literature, music and dance began. This was also known as New Negro Movement. Then later referred to the Harlem Renaissance as we know it today. "Critic and teacher Alain Locke described it as a "spiritual coming of age" in which the black community was able to seize upon its "first chances for group expression and self determination." '(Great Days in Harlem1). Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald are some of the artists who came out in the Harlem Renaissance.

In this period they were trying to illuminate the world to the fact that African Americans were not the same as White Americans.What really encouraged them to start this was to try to make awarness to the white people of what talents themselves black or as they called themselves negro people had. They were try to say that they were just as talents or some even more than the white people and were going a lot to try to push that aspect and it meant so much to them that ththe-great-depression.jpge white finally excepted that.




For the first time white and black owned companies and publishers were helping publish and even promote the blacks literacy works (Cyprus1). Not just white figures but black figures too, were now being able to take a part of the credit in American arts. The black were able to play for the white and the same the other way around as well. African-American plays, poetry, fiction and essays were produced at a high rate. In 1930's the Harlem Renaissance started to slow itself and wind down as part of this was at fault by the Great Depression. The Great Depression was part responsible because of the finacial nessisities and struggles during this time.

The Harlem Renaissance was a huge time of change. There were changes from clothing all the way to womans rights and many more were things and ways changed as well. At the end of the Harlem Renaissance the woman were able to vote and could wear skirts above the ankle. There were also many other things changed during this time period. The rise of a new African American art movement and they were highly successful in contributing to arts and entertainment. The city of Harlem, where most of the Harlem Renaissance took place, was drastically changed during and after the Harlem Renaissance. Harlem became much more well known for the good and bad.

During the Harlem time period, many events that affected us today took place. September 8, 1921, the first Miss. America pageant was held in Atlantic City. The pageant winner was Margaret Gorman,who passed away in early October of 1995 at age 90. There has been a Miss. America beauty pageant almost every year since 1921. On November 26, 1922, archeologist Howard Carter found the tomb stone of Tutankhamen near Luxor, Egypt. This amazing discovery has led to many more findings from the ancient Egyptian time. Students everywhere are still being taught about Tutankhamen and all the discoveries from Egypt. February 3, President Warren G. Harding passed away leaving vice president Calvin Coolidge in office (Hanson). The death of the president was cause by a heart attack and it left the country in shock.
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October 2, 1925, John Baird invents the first form of a television. The first television was like a blue print for televisions now. There are over hundreds of television making companies today. The 1920’s were, for 8 years and 3/4 of 1929, a very happy decade. The last 1/4 was the Stock Market Crash that could have started the Great Depression that lasted throughout the 1930’s, not ending until mid-1940. A war started before 1920, and a war broke out in 1929. Although it was called the Great Depression, people killed others, themselves, became homeless, and penniless. (Hanson).
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The roaring 20’s left us with many memories throughout the years. It was a time of social change. Although it ended on a bad note, it was a time for beginnings of many traditions we have today. Between flappers and dancing to an economy crisis, the Harlem renaissance will always be remembered.

The Harlem Renaissance was an African American cultural movement in the 1920’s and early 1930’s. This time is also variously referred to as the Negro movement which also refers to the African American community. This cultural movement was centered in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. Mainly ranging in location from Twenty-seventh to Fifty- third streets on the West side of Manhattan (Carrick 34).This renaissance appointed the first of mainstream publishers and critics paid attention to African American literature. Publishers and critics also took the African American arts more seriously. African American arts attracted much attention from the large growing nation. This movement was generally litrary. It closely relates to the developments in African American music, theater, art, and politics.
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As the growing nation improved the black middle class prospered. Black authors were writing more and more books. Some of these authors are Jessie Fauset, Langston Hughes, Larsen Nella, and many more. Along with these authors many black musicians and artists were becoming very popular in the growing nation. Theater and politics were also coming into view in the new movement.African American musicians brought many new types of music to the new movement. Some these new popular types of music were Jazz, blues, ragtime and more.


The voices of the 1920's were considered to be the people on the radio . Radio was such a popular new thing at the time and poeple found out what was the news. On the radio were many different brodcasting stations. The hosts were poeple with very good voice vocals and personality. Some hosts include Edward Murrow, Jack Benny, and many more. Brodcasts would consume of world news, drama, comedy, and adventure.
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As the Harlem Renaissance had brought many changes to it's time, it also had a big impact on how we live our lives today. The 1920's symbolized breaking away from society's bounderies. The 1920's was symply an explosion on self expression, the automobile being the biggest one (Elliott 1). Transportation needed to be improved. People were in such great demand of better transportation becuase it would be 3 miles to the grocery store and take 30 minutes. Untill Henry Ford introduced the model T. Soon after this innovation on wheels started to turn. Of cousre style and looks were not thought about when these were made. The model T. came in one color only, black. Henry Ford used to say " You can have any color you want as long as it's black". Regardless of wether good or bad, each individual in the country that was greatly influenced by the automoblie (Elliott 2).
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Work citied:
Cyprus, Sheri. "What was the Harlem Renaissance?." wise geek (2003-2009) 20 Jan 2009 <http://www.wisegeek.com/what-was-the-harlem-renaissance.htm>.
Great Days in Harlem, "Great Days in Harlem the birth of the Harlem Renaissance." infoplease. 2007. Pearson Eductation. 20 Jan 2009 <http://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmharlem1.html>.
B.S. Stewart , Gail. "the roaring 20's." 1920's. 26 Jan 2009 <http://www.kidsnewsroom.org/elmer/infoCentral/frameset/decade/1920.htm>.
1921, "1921." Miss.America . 26 Jan 2009 <http://www.missamerica.com/our-miss-americas/1920/1921.aspx>.
"Harlem Renaissance," Microsoft® Encarta® Online Encyclopedia 2008http://encarta.msn.com © 1997-2008 Microsoft Corporation. All Rights Reserved.© 1993-2008 Microsoft Corporation. All Rights Reserved
foundation of the harlem renaissance, "Foundation of The Harlem Renaissance." The Voices of African- Americans. 26 Jan 2009 <http://home.wlu.edu/~connerm/AfAmStudies/Contemporary%20Culture%20Project/Voice%20Of%20African-%20Americans/index.htm>.
Stewart, Gail B.. Timelines 1920. New York, NY: crestwood House, 1989.